Intro

All content of this blog is my own opinion only. It does not represent the views of any organisation or association I may work for, or be associated with. Nothing within this blog should be considered as medical advice and you should always consult your Doctor.

Effective breastfeeding - it's not all about the latch

It was a new mum that first mentioned this to me, and as soon as she did it dawned on me that she was totally right.  When supporting mums, lots of focus is on latch - because obviously the better the latch, often the less pain and the more effectively baby can feed; but all too often we meet a mum with a slow gaining baby who is always wanting to feed, or perhaps a mum with sore/cracked nipples sometimes resulting in a the shape of a lipstick! and then we hear "the midwife/health visitor has checked my latch and said it was fine...".  Really if I had a pound for everytime I heard it, I would be writing this blog from Mauritius

This mum called me because she fell into all three of these categories - her baby was being supplemented with expressed breastmilk because of very slow gain, nipples were sore which the midwife had put down to baby spending long periods at the breast (with her supposed "perfect latch") and mum instinctively knew something wasn't right that was being missed.  Almost as soon as I had stepped through the door mum posed the question that had been bothering her: "everyone keeps telling me everything is fine, but I really don't think she's actually having much milk, yet when I say she doesn't seem to swallow lots,  they just keep saying latch looks fine - can it appear fine and yet baby still not take much milk?

And she's right- there's often little emphasis from mainstream sources on how to tell if baby is actually drinking lots of milk, either to mums or to health professionals; sure jaw moving and a swallow pattern generally gets some coverage - but does such basic information really help a new mum or busy health professional?  

Whilst latch is a significant indicator, there are several problems with relying solely on it; firstly unless you are trained and experienced specifically in this area, identifying good latch from not so effective can be a tricky job.  Babies can look well latched on and in fact be swallowing little, and others can start well and gradually close their mouth as the feed progresses.

Those helping in the early days often hand over to someone else for later care - so some never see the longterm outcome of their advice, never realise that latch they thought was "fine" really wasn't.  Shoes are my favourite example - it's comparable to someone saying their shoes hurt, having whopping great heel blisters and then an experienced shoe fitter telling them that "sorry, but they appear to fit fine".

Secondly even if someone feels confident assessing latch, it's about more than just what is going on externally and is visible to the eye; as a very wise lady one told me - unless you have x-ray vision to see what is going on inside, it's impossible to state with any certainty things are "fine" - not when mum is presenting with all the signs something isn't right.  Milk transfer is still the key -  is the baby effectively milking the breast and drinking to satiation when they get there?  or are they attempting the equivalent of drinking through a squished straw and running out of steam before they are truly finished, often never experiencing the "drunk" look babies get at the end of a feed, perhaps wanting to feed again an hour later?

Lastly latch can be subjective - some infants "appear" to be attached suboptimally, yet take lots of milk, fill nappies appropriately and are content and settled between feeds; if mum and baby are happy with time spent at the breast and baby is growing as expected - sometimes the phrase "if it aint broken, don't fix it" is worth remembering.  
LLLI - Asymmetric latch

Back to the mum I started with; I observed a feed in her favourite position - mouth was wide and taking some breast tissue, rather than just the "nipple suckling" that causes hollow cheeks and seems to be the typical "bad latch" often recognised.  However baby was not latched asymmetrically, and it became immediately apparent that whilst baby occasionally swallowed, little milk was being consumed; mum was totally right.  Had the midwife been watching for milk transfer as well as latch, it would have been picked up a lot earlier than when I saw her at 6 weeks.

The next bit of this article is lifted from another recent entry I made: Is my breastfed baby getting enough?  (and things you can do if not) - and it perfectly highlights how a baby may "appear" to some to be latched "ok", but it actually not latched well enough to be able to drink efficiently!  

The first clip below shows "nibbling" or ineffective feeding: Baby is doing almost no drinking. A baby who breastfeeds only with this type of sucking could stay on the breast for hours and still not get enough milk. Something needs to be done here and if achieving a better latch, using compression doesn’t help, the baby almost certainly needs to be supplemented (Newman).




Now compare this to the clip below, where baby is doing some really good drinking: The pauses are very long (this is the mouth filling); this baby could spend a very short period of time on the breast and still be getting plenty of milk (Newman)


Note the difference in positioning in these clips.  In the first baby is meeting the breast almost vertically - with nose, mouth and chin meeting the breast at the same time.  As you can see the baby's nose sites very close to the breast, potentially making it difficult for him to feed well and breathe easily.   In the second clip baby's head is flexed back and the chin meets the breast first, the nose is then well clear from the breast tissue.  This asymmetric latch means more of the areola below the nipple than above is in baby's mouth - allowing him to milk the breast easily and consume lots of milk.

It's also not always a case of excellent or bad - there can be a whole host of "good" drinkers too, which is another great example of why timing feeds just doesn't work.  A baby feeding as per the really good drinking clip is is likely to be satiated super fast, maybe as little as ten minutes - the next clip below shows a "good drinker" - still milking the breast effectively, but not quite as well as the "really good feeding" above (note the shorter pauses) so maybe he will take 20 minutes.  The baby in the very first clip is likely never to be truly satiated and may hang around an age and then want to feed again perhaps only an hour later.  Please note these times are only examples!



You can see more asymmetrical latch clips here.

40 comments:

  1. Fabulous post. Wish you had been able to help me feeding my four! Took sheer determination/bloody mindedness and persistence on my part and a lot of ignoring ill-informed and totally BF ignorant HVs to get past 6 weeks with the younger 3. The twins BF til 16 months :)

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  2. May also be worth mentioning checking for tongue tie here?
    Her latch looked fine but her milk transfer obviously wasn't. We got there in the end though!

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  3. Olive, I agree. Bugs me no end why tongie-tie isn't checked in hospital before release, like lots of other things are - takes a second to check. Ours wasn't picked up until baby was 5 months + - 2 bouts of mastitis later.......

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  4. Interesting.... I had *huge* amounts of pain for the first 8+ weeks of BF, but (luckily for us) he was obviously feeding efficiently as he put one weight very well indeed. And everyone (including a BFC and LLL Leader) said his latch 'looked fine'!

    Never did work out why it hurt so very much (no obvious trauma). I suspect it was a combination of things, but his mouth growing certainly helped.

    We're still going strong 27 months later (but I'm pregnant and it hurts a lot again!)

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  5. Thanks all :) I did consider adding tonngue tie in, in fact I spent ages trying to decide whether to include it. But then I thought if I touch on it, a lot without experience with it have little idea so I have to expand on it; and as you say if there's TT there will be little effective transfer which is more the focus. I thought I might dedicate a whole entry to TT at some point?

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  6. Excellent post. I heard Dr. Newman talk about the asymmetric latch at a conference a few years back and it changed how I looked at "latch issues" with the women I work with. And as for TT, I agree it should be checked for in hospital before release. It is such a simple thing to remedy can help avoid "issues" down the road.

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  7. Insightful post - well done.

    It is great to see that somebody else focuses on milk transfer when assessing feeds but failure to transfer milk doesn't always stem from a poor latch. A history of the labour and delivery may highlight cranial compression which affect the nerves servicing the tongue and results in a disorganised suck (specifically Hypo-glossal and glosso-pharyngeal nerves)

    Regarding TT, see Catherine Watson Genna - looking for a high arched palate has helped me identify many a posterior tongue tie and subsequent frenulotomy (as per recent research proves beneficial)

    Keep up the good work :)

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  8. QUOTE is great to see that somebody else focuses on milk transfer when assessing feeds but failure to transfer milk doesn't always stem from a poor latch

    Thanks :) my thoughts were that tongue ties, palate issues, residual cranial "stresses" - all do interfere with the ability to latch well and milk the breast effectively; if we are considering latch as not only external action, but also what's going on inside the mouth.

    So if a HP is looking for milk transfer as well as just whether baby "appears" to be attached ok - it would be flagged if not drinking well. Of course at this point the next step is to establish why baby isn't latching well - is it positioning or something else going on such as described. Perhaps I should have included this in the post?

    Yes re TT and high arched palate :) I too find this a great indicator, it's due to the tongue action inutero being involved with palate formation isn't it.

    ps be great if people could sign off with a name when using the anon option - even if it's a user name, it saves me typing "dear anon" however many times lol plus if replying to more than one person can be difficult without being able to reply to a name to show who I'm answering :)

    Although I recognise some of you even without names LOL

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  9. I am a student at the Newman Breastfeeding Clinic in Toronto and I can tell you that the most important thing I feel we teach every mother is how to tell if the baby is drinking or just sucking!!! If you cannot tell what the baby is doing how are you supposed to know what action to take???

    Poor milk transfer can be caused by so many variables that without taking a complete history from a patient it's hard to say what the cause is. Sometimes even with a full history we never know why there is poor transfer or low flow. Sadly a lot of healthcare professionals will give a breastfeeding mother "advice" but never even watch a feed. And to all those people who tell Mum's "your latch is perfect" when she is in excruciating pain..you need to look for a new profession! Breastfeeding should NOT hurt and if it does it means something is not right.

    great post :-)

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  10. I had a horrible time nursing baby #4. ihad successfully nursed twins for 26 months, 7 months exclusively, and bfed a 3rd child almost 3 years with no problem. I am a large breasted woman so the first Lactation consultant thought it was a case of small mouth/big nipples, but a second LC discovered that although i have very large breasts My nipples are small and it was just an incomplete latch. He was just not pulling enough breast into his mouth. When that was discovered and corrected, everything fell in to place. So in my case it was latch, but undiagnosed.I love your post, because he looked like he was on there just fine, but wasn't. A good lactation consultant is worth thier weight in gold

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  11. See that you're thinking of dedicating a post to tt at some point-think it's a good idea if it covers the lot (such as posterior tt aswell). I had loads of trouble feeding both boys as did my friend prob all 3 had posterior tt and in the case of my boys potential bubble palate which often goes hand in hand with tt. The reason I mention this is that my friend and I both had lots of pain, mishapen nipples etc etc, although latch LOOKED fine tt was causing probs. Weight gain however with all boys was good - perhaps due to strong let down? Anyway...ramble ramble, many mothers might be disheartened by the weeks it can take to find a way of nursing that works for that particular nursing couple, and prob few HP would be able/willing to support them through that.

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  12. I couldn´t have put it better myself. I had the very same problem with my third child (who incidentally was tongue-tied). I was very sore for 3 weeks but I was told my com. midwife that the latch look ok. Well, it may have looked ok but it didn´t feel right. It was only my determination and some help from an online breastfeeding counsellor that I was able to overcome it. Like you say, it is not just looking at the latch that is important, taking everything else (such as weight gain, feeding pattern etc) into account is what matters most.

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  13. Yes Selina would include laterals, labial ties, and palates.
    I remember clearly your suffering in the early weeks - and people saying it looked fine! it was when you said your nipples looked like lipsticks when we had an online chat that I asked if you had had TT ruled out (do you remember?) and I think you managed to get to see M who noticed both.

    It apparently used to be totally routine for midwives to look for and then snip TT immediately at birth;I wish they still did!

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  14. I wish we were able to (I´m a midwife) but these days you´re lucky if anyone acknowledges it that there is a problem (well, that is if TT gets diagnosed at birth which very often doesn´t. I´ve picked a few on day 2 or 3 before) and then getting paediatricians or maxillofacial surgeons to deal with it. In some hospitals willing midwives get trained to do it. Unfortunately, that doesn´t happen in most.

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  15. Hi, I notice that in each of the videos, the baby is positioned cross-cradle. As I feed baby in the rugny hold, I was wondering how the latch should 'look'? How/where should the nose/mouth/chin be positioned/look? Im fairly big, D cups, so find cross-cradle troublesome and I have only ever managed to feed successfully in the rugby hold.

    Thank you

    A first time Mommy

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  16. I'm in exactly the same position as the above poster! I can't find any advice on the rugby hold anywhere! I find it very confusing!

    Thanks!

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  17. Hi
    Let me try and dig you out something in that position :)

    In terms of latch - if you look at the picture halfway down on the right, the dotted area is where baby will latch. So the bottom lip is planted quite far down the areola, whereas there is less above (can you see? so it's asymmetric rather than baby being in the centre and having an equal amount above and below) in the rugby hold, ensuring your baby's head is flexed back (just as per the clip) allows you to have more control over where the bottom lip lands, because baby is coming in chin first. The effective feeding is then as the clip - a regular suck swallow pattern with long pauses = mouth filling = good.

    In "baby across" you type holds, it's often easier if you just focus on keeping baby's shoulders/chest close - then there's no need to support the brest :)

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  18. It's as if you're describing my experience with dd1. Lipstick shaped nipple, poor weight gain and never coming off breast, and feeding again an hour later, no dirty nappies for up to 12 days. Oh yeah, and cracked/bleeding nipples for first 8 weeks too!
    I don't know how many support groups I visited, had 3 mw, 3 bf counsellors check, all said it was fine.
    Now with dd2 I can tell the difference. No pain, all the boxes ticked and what a difference. Suddenly breast feeding is easy.

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  19. Sounds like you had a very tough experience cartside. Did anyone rule out tongue tie or even harder to spot, lateral tongue tie or palate differences such as a bubble or high arched palate in your first babe (also often linked with tongue tie?)

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  20. no, I went to bf support group, they watched me feed, and were happy as long as she put on some weight. She's 3 1/2 now and healthy girl, so no damage done, but I never got rid of the feeling that she wasn't getting enough or something wasn't quite right. I bf for 23 months, so at least it didn't mean early weaning!

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  21. Wow they watched you feed, saw the lipstick nipple and fel it was ok as long as baby was gaining some weight?
    Have a good peer in her mouth now! lol maybe when brushing teeth? if you can get her to lift her tongue you may be able to see if it's tied underneath, if you can't see anything, if she will let you have a feel sweeping under the tongue with a clean little finger - if there's a lateral tie you can often feel the "speed bump". Also look at roof of mouth (palate) and see if you can see any difference from younger one?

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  22. I wish I'd had support from someone like you when I was going through the same things! I told HV's and BF counsellors time and time again things weren't right and dd wasn't hardly gaining weight.

    I am very familiar with the Dr Jack Newman videos as I spent hours trying to find help elsewhere when everyone dismissed my worries. Finally we paid a lactation consultant who diagnosed (and snipped) my daughter's tongue tie at 9 weeks, but I couldn't afford to pay for more than one follow up visit.

    Subsequently, going back to the NHS support was ultimately our downfall, that and a very stubborn daughter who HATED having her bad habits corrected each time she fed. She went on a hunger strike at 13 weeks, lost weight and I didn't have the support I needed to keep going so I stopped bf at 14 weeks.

    I have learnt many lessons from my experiences though and will use them next time. I have bookmarked this blog so I can look up the key points when I need to use the info again.

    K

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  23. Hi K
    I'm really sad to read your story - but also want to applaud you for getting as far as 14 weeks.

    My other post "is baby getting enough and what to do if not" may also ring bells with you, as yes at the moment there seems to be lots of dismissing of slow gain. I think the worry is mums will supplement, but it's not about that, it's about evaluating whether there is an undiagnosed underlying factor (like the TT) and supporting mums get breastfeeding going WELL.

    You mention breastfeeding counsellors - were these within the NHS or from one of the orgs? Unfortunately apart from the lactation consultant (IBCLC) employed in some areas, in many it is down to peer supporters (13 weeks training and a band 2 low paid job) to run the whole schebang. Wrote about this a while ago so may well convert into a blog post here.

    As TT can be genetic - at least you will know next time and can get this checked out early on :)

    AA

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  24. Thank you for your reply, I read the other blog "is my baby getting enough and what to do if not" and it was completely rang true in my case.

    The breastfeeding counsellors were NHS nursery nurses (apart from the IBCLC one we paid privately for but we could only afford 3 visits - one where she diagnosed the TT, one where she snipped it and one follow up visit). We also paid for a course of cranial osteopathy which I am sure helped a great deal too.

    To be honest, I don't blame the nursery nurse, it was her support (along witht he cranial osteopath's advice and support) that kept me determined to keep going for as long as possible, but ultimately, as you say, their training is limited and in hindsight I feel let down by the NHS, but not by her if you know what I mean?

    I will definitely be keeping an eye out for tongue tie when I venture to have a 2nd baby, getting that sorted out early may help things to go just a *little* more smoothly next time :)

    K

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  25. Hi K
    This is my big annoyance with NHS care - with all respect to the "nursery nurse", she's not a breastfeeding counsellor (although her colleagues may use the title!) and yes not her fault she is expected to work way beyond her remit. So mums think they've seen help - couldn't resolve the issue and give up.....(not in your case - but on a big general level)

    IBCLC's can be expensive - I was trying to locate support for a mum in a different area last year and she quoted £65 per hour, with the first visit taking upto 2 hours. So mums basically needed £130 for a vist. In the scheme of things this is (obviously) still a lot cheaper than a year of formula, but an be a lot to find in one go with a new baby.

    All the best
    AA

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  26. I never really thought about it like that but you're exactly right in respect to new mums feeling like they have had support when actually its not quite what it should have been. The advice the nursery nurse gave was not much help to be honest, but it was the moral support she provided, along with my own determination, that helped keep me going. So really, if I'd had support from a bf counsellor then that would have been more useful - I will bear that in mind for next time too.

    The IBCLC was £70 per visit if I remember, but more for the frenulotomy, so definitely not cheap, and its not the sort of thing new parents factor into their budget either.

    I wish I had known all this stuff while I was pregnant, i think I was a more than a bit naive (despite reading all sorts of books, magazines and websites, but obviously not the right ones!). Every thing has a positive side though, at least I have learnt many lessons from my experiences that I can use another time :)

    K

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  27. I don't know much, so please let me know if I'm wrong, but in my experience the opposite can be true as well. I had a lot of trouble the first 8 weeks and every time I thought things were improving I had a hv or nurse tell me his latch was terrible and that his weight gain was only temporary and that there would be trouble later. I got very little advice on how to fix this, and found it very confusing, frightening, and discouraging. Every time I was told I was failing I seemed to get more pain and felt like I should quit. In hindsight, I am annoyed by this advice- it was very cavalier and irresponsible. At the time I just cried a lot. Finally a NCT counselor told me that his latch wasn't the issue- he just had the latch of a slightly older baby, and that my overproduction was causing more problems. Sure enough, got the over production managed (but not eliminated, just found tricks to not overwhelm baby) and things got so much better. Still going strong at 8 months. (Of course, now the NHS are trying to get me to quit bc I have to have gall bladder surgery and they don't want to deal with a nursing baby, but that's a whole different story)

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  28. Can you come help me out? All the BFCs ive seen say latch is good but ive battled thro a tongue tie causing ductal thrush and most recently mastitus (twice) and i still have a very sore left side and brace myself when he feeds on that side. Yet eveything 'looks' good. All ive been told is he has a bumpy tongue and that causes chaffing and the sore nipple-he will grow into it and the bumpy tongue wont be a problem then. Great-tell that to my 2yr old who i at times cant tandem nurse due to the pain!
    To be fair the BFC have tried and its a good service we are lucky to have.

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  29. thanks you for a thought provoking post.
    I am one of those mother who had a suboptimal latch with my 3rd child. He has a tongue tie and I have oversupply issues so he actually pinched the breast! It was not painful and any attempts to change it to a more optimal position hurt me and my son was not impressed. He was however gaining weight very well and you could see the above pattern of sucking going on.
    I will share this :)
    Fiona , Peer supporter Flintshire

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  30. Caroline email me with where you are x

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  31. Excellent, brilliant to have videos. Kirsty

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  32. Happened across this blog last night. My two month-okd DD is pooping, peeing and putting on weight (birth weight was 5.5 lbs, now she weighs 9.38). The issue? I have an oversupply of milk, she has a high palate and strong gag reflex. Try as I might, I can not get her to take a deep latch. So I have sore nipples. Yet she is gaining and producing dirty diapers. I had to use formula and a nipple shield for one and a quarter months (she gained 8 oz within the first week and a half while BF'ing, then 5 and 7 oz the following weeks respectively). So breastfeeding is fairly new to us. Will this correct itself on its own?

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  33. Ok... here is my opinion. They should not certify anyone who has not successfully breast fed a child or children to be an LC. And they should check every single child born (regardless if child is formula or breast fed) for tongue/lip tie. Analytical Armadillo thanks so much for your amazing and informative articles.

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  34. Can anatomical variations in the mother also cause pain while nursing? Such as inverted nipples?

    When my son was born, I was determined to breastfeed. There was some initial discomfort, and by one week, my left breast was fine (no pain) but my right breast was very tender with a crack. Then some bad position advice from a nurse at a breast feeding clinic made the pain I felt while nursing on that side almost unbearable in one 10 minute nursing session. I finally bought a nipple shield and used it for about 3 weeks just on the right side until the nipple healed, the pain went away, and I could nurse without it on that side without repeating, "I love you I love you I love you."

    I have slightly inverted nipples, with a nipple easily forming when the erectile tissue is stimulated. However, on my right nipple, it looks folded in so that where the milk comes out from was a vertical line. Seventeen months of breastfeeding have "pulled out" the area of the nipple where the milk comes out but it still does not look like my other side. In the beginning, it seemed like my son had to suck harder and longer on the right side for the milk to flow through the nipple. Not because his latch on that side was bad, but because the nipple itself was different.

    I am glad that I did not have such pain initially on both sides. It at least told me that some of what I was doing was right.

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  35. Just found this thread,and I'm comforted I'm not alone in my bf issues.
    My baby is a month old, and while she is gaining weight now (she lost 12.4% of birth weight in the first 10 days), its not fast enough - just 2oz gained in 9 days at our last weigh in.
    I'm not sure if the issue is my milk supply or her milk transfer - or both maybe?
    We had a tough start: I had very low haemoglobin levels due to blood loss, baby had jaundice so was very sleepy & also minor TT which was snipped at 3 weeks - although the nursing nurse we saw was convinced this was not causing the issue with weight gain.
    We have plenty of wet nappies, but not so many dirty - I've had conflicting advice about whether this is normal or not.
    Numerous midwives, breast feeding councillors have told me her latch looks perfect.
    Yet weight gain is an issue, and now I know how to tell if she's swallowing, I can see she only swallows every 2-3 sucks at most. Baby quickly tires at the breast -breast compression helps a little, as does frequently swapping sides. However, she continues to fal asleep - I think she's full, it she is hungry again a short time later.
    I'm trying to pump,but struggling as baby is at the breast so frequently - early morning I may get 1oz per breast, but other times it can be as little as 5ml per breast. Again I've had conflicting advice about whether pumping output is indicative of actual milk supply.
    I've had to resort to formula top ups so I can try to increase weight gain, continuing to pump & give expressed milk if I can, but I never seem to get enough to give ebm exclusively.
    I desperately want to breastfeed my baby, but I'm concerned the top ups will reduce my milk supply, which may already be poor, and that I'm not going to be able to sustain bf much longer.

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  36. Just found this thread,and I'm comforted I'm not alone in my bf issues.
    My baby is a month old, and while she is gaining weight now (she lost 12.4% of birth weight in the first 10 days), its not fast enough - just 2oz gained in 9 days at our last weigh in.
    I'm not sure if the issue is my milk supply or her milk transfer - or both maybe?
    We had a tough start: I had very low haemoglobin levels due to blood loss, baby had jaundice so was very sleepy & also minor TT which was snipped at 3 weeks - although the nursing nurse we saw was convinced this was not causing the issue with weight gain.
    We have plenty of wet nappies, but not so many dirty - I've had conflicting advice about whether this is normal or not.
    Numerous midwives, breast feeding councillors have told me her latch looks perfect.
    Yet weight gain is an issue, and now I know how to tell if she's swallowing, I can see she only swallows every 2-3 sucks at most. Baby quickly tires at the breast -breast compression helps a little, as does frequently swapping sides. However, she continues to fal asleep - I think she's full, it she is hungry again a short time later.
    I'm trying to pump,but struggling as baby is at the breast so frequently - early morning I may get 1oz per breast, but other times it can be as little as 5ml per breast. Again I've had conflicting advice about whether pumping output is indicative of actual milk supply.
    I've had to resort to formula top ups so I can try to increase weight gain, continuing to pump & give expressed milk if I can, but I never seem to get enough to give ebm exclusively.
    I desperately want to breastfeed my baby, but I'm concerned the top ups will reduce my milk supply, which may already be poor, and that I'm not going to be able to sustain bf much longer.

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  37. I just came across this blog while looking for some help and support after feeling let down by everyone including mw's with an interest in breastfeeding. My baby daughter has just been discharged from hospital where she was admitted due to no weight gain, not even gaining her birth weight at 8 weeks. So now she is 9 weeks old and after supplementing with formula in hospital she put on weight, which I am happy about...but I am disheartened that no one tried to 'fix' our breasfeeding problem. I waseven told that I will never be able to breastfeed exclusively and that I just need to accept this as the truth. Needless to say I cried loads in hospital and I lost confidence in my ability to breastfeed and since leaving hospital last night I have noticed a huge drop in my milk production or let down (?) not sure, I have painful breasts but the baby struggles and eventually I give up and give formula as I am scared of everyone shouting at me again for 'underfeeding' my daughter.

    Some info:
    Birth weight 3180g
    Weight at 1 week 2850g
    Weight at 4 weeks 3000g
    Weight at 6 weeks 3050g
    Weight at 8 weeks 3120g
    Hospital admission and formula then:
    Weight at 9 weeks 3320g

    I am desperate for some professional help, if you can at least tell me where I can get that I will be very grateful.

    A new mum.

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    Replies
    1. Hi, please email me analytical armadillo @ live.co.uk (remove spaces) and I can absolutely help you locate someone specialist enough to help you turn things around whilst helping to protect your baby's intake and thus weight gain :)
      AA

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  38. I forgot to say that I am in the UK.

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  39. Pigeon42, I could have written that post myself, apart from the medical issues you encountered.

    I would love to know how things turned out for you now as it has been a while since you posted.

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